Selected posts from Hypotheses blogs

Wikipédia : un outil pour l’historien ?

Wikipedia: a tool for historians?

Wikipedia is often considered not to be a particularly reliable source by teachers in secondary schools and higher education. Generations of pupils and students have heard warnings about the reliability of the online encyclopaedia and there have even been bans on using it. The idea spread around, particularly in schools, that...

Syrian refugees’ journey from Jordan to Germany

This field report is part of a project of doctoral research into the networks and dynamics of Syrian exile to Jordan. This research is based on longitudinal monitoring of an ordinary group of refugees from Deir Mqaren – a village in the Rif Dimashq Governorate – and its aim is...

“You’ve got some nerve asking me a question like that!”

This is an adaptation of a presentation called “Quand dire c’est faire violence” I gave during a study day at the University of Nantes on January 31st.  In Les interactions verbales, Catherine Kerbrat-Orecchioni speaks of the difficulty in establishing the relationship between places occupied in interviews, because of the dissymmetry of...

Russia’s technological power in the collective imagination. The UVB76 fantasy – half conspiracy theory, half cult of mystery.

Have you heard of UVB76? A mysterious Russian military radio frequency which started transmitting in the 1970s for reasons no-one seems to know? As part of my research into representations of Russia’s technological power, here is a modest little text on the subject. It takes another look at this amusing anecdote...

The power of flowers in detective novels

Flowers (fleurs in French) are part of the recurring vocabulary in detective novels and are present in more or less fixed expressions. For example potential victims have “nerfs à fleur de peau” (frayed nerves), suspects are “effleurés par un soupcon” (vaguely suspected) like Henriette in The Queen’s Necklace 1 a short...